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sophygurl:


10 Things Food Banks Need But Won’t Ask For
Some items are in high demand at the food bank and you may not realize it. Because they aren’t essentials, the staff doesn’t publicly ask for them. A survey asked volunteers what items people would be most appreciative of and we’ve listed the top 10 below. If you’re looking for an easy way to help out, pick some of these up while shopping and drop them off at one of our area food banks.
1. Spices.
Think about it. People who rely on the food bank eat a lot of canned food, rice, oatmeal, white bread, etc. They love spices. Seasoned salt, cayenne pepper, chili powder, cumin, cinnamon, nutmeg, allspice, oregano, basil and so on.
2. Feminine Products.
Can you imagine being worried about affording these? Pads, tampons, panty liners, etc. Recommended: Buy in bulk at Costco for donating.
3. Chocolate.
People don’t need it, but think about being in their shoes and how nice it would be to be given a chocolate bar or brownie mix along with your essentials.
4. Toiletries.
Grocery stores are great about donating surplus or unsold food, but they have no reason to donate toilet paper, tooth paste, soap, deodorant, shampoo, etc. Food stamps often don’t cover these.
5. Canned meats and jerky.
This isn’t true of all food banks, but some struggle to give users enough protein.
6. Crackers and tortillas.
They don’t spoil and everybody likes them.
7. Baby toiletries.
Diapers, baby wipes, baby formula, baby shampoo, baby soap, baby food, bottles, etc.
8. Soup packets.
Sometimes you look at rice, beans, instant potatoes, and cans of vegetable and think, “What do I make with this?” Hearty soup is a complete meal.
9. Socks.
From a former homeless person: “Socks mean the world to you. They keep you warm, make you feel like you have something new, and just comfort you.”
10. Canned fruit other than pineapple.
Food banks get a lot of pineapple donated. Their clients love it when other kinds of fruit are available.
[SOURCE]
And remember! Food banks love cash donations because it allows them to buy whatever they need!

As a sometimes food pantry user myself and with friends who rely on them to varying degrees - I want to specifically stress some of these:
 - non-food items like tp and feminine products and baby needs are SO incredibly important because 1) they are rarely donated, 2) people who have food stamps can often afford their food staples but might still need help with toiletries and cleaning items, and 3) folks who are homeless especially need that kinda stuff!
 - treats! Like, yes of course, if I am in need I am appreciative of canned goods and rice and pasta and stuff. That’s great for putting together healthy meals. But everyone needs a treat once in awhile - so when there is candy or chips or a nice expensive brand of organic something or other available at the pantry - it is just so incredibly exciting.
It can be a humiliating experience to visit a pantry, and it can make you feel very much less than. So to get a treat of some sort just really really makes a difference. And believe me - there are enough loaves of bread, cans of fruit, and dried beans to go around at these places. You won’t be starving someone by donating some microwave popcorn or chocolate chips now and again. I promise!

sophygurl:

10 Things Food Banks Need But Won’t Ask For

Some items are in high demand at the food bank and you may not realize it. Because they aren’t essentials, the staff doesn’t publicly ask for them. A survey asked volunteers what items people would be most appreciative of and we’ve listed the top 10 below. If you’re looking for an easy way to help out, pick some of these up while shopping and drop them off at one of our area food banks.

1. Spices.

Think about it. People who rely on the food bank eat a lot of canned food, rice, oatmeal, white bread, etc. They love spices. Seasoned salt, cayenne pepper, chili powder, cumin, cinnamon, nutmeg, allspice, oregano, basil and so on.

2. Feminine Products.

Can you imagine being worried about affording these? Pads, tampons, panty liners, etc. Recommended: Buy in bulk at Costco for donating.

3. Chocolate.

People don’t need it, but think about being in their shoes and how nice it would be to be given a chocolate bar or brownie mix along with your essentials.

4. Toiletries.

Grocery stores are great about donating surplus or unsold food, but they have no reason to donate toilet paper, tooth paste, soap, deodorant, shampoo, etc. Food stamps often don’t cover these.

5. Canned meats and jerky.

This isn’t true of all food banks, but some struggle to give users enough protein.

6. Crackers and tortillas.

They don’t spoil and everybody likes them.

7. Baby toiletries.

Diapers, baby wipes, baby formula, baby shampoo, baby soap, baby food, bottles, etc.

8. Soup packets.

Sometimes you look at rice, beans, instant potatoes, and cans of vegetable and think, “What do I make with this?” Hearty soup is a complete meal.

9. Socks.

From a former homeless person: “Socks mean the world to you. They keep you warm, make you feel like you have something new, and just comfort you.”

10. Canned fruit other than pineapple.

Food banks get a lot of pineapple donated. Their clients love it when other kinds of fruit are available.

[SOURCE]

And remember! Food banks love cash donations because it allows them to buy whatever they need!

As a sometimes food pantry user myself and with friends who rely on them to varying degrees - I want to specifically stress some of these:

 - non-food items like tp and feminine products and baby needs are SO incredibly important because 1) they are rarely donated, 2) people who have food stamps can often afford their food staples but might still need help with toiletries and cleaning items, and 3) folks who are homeless especially need that kinda stuff!

 - treats! Like, yes of course, if I am in need I am appreciative of canned goods and rice and pasta and stuff. That’s great for putting together healthy meals. But everyone needs a treat once in awhile - so when there is candy or chips or a nice expensive brand of organic something or other available at the pantry - it is just so incredibly exciting.

It can be a humiliating experience to visit a pantry, and it can make you feel very much less than. So to get a treat of some sort just really really makes a difference. And believe me - there are enough loaves of bread, cans of fruit, and dried beans to go around at these places. You won’t be starving someone by donating some microwave popcorn or chocolate chips now and again. I promise!

Grand-papa, j’ai fini l’université.

Pourtant, je ressens un grand vide. Tu n’es pas là pour partager cette fierté avec moi. La raison pour laquelle je me suis tellement poussée lors de mes études, c’était en partie à cause de toi, et je ne peux même pas t’appeler pour partager ce moment.

Je regarde l’heure: 9:07PM. Lorsque je t’appelais, c’était aux alentour de cette hure car tu étais à Vancouver, et tu arrivais du travail. C’est dans des moments comme aujourd’hui qui rend ton absence, même après quatre ans, presque insoutenable. Tu ne m’as pas vue lors de ma graduation du secondaire. Tu ne m’as pas vue lorsque j’ai reçue ma lettre d’admission à l’Université dans le programme de mon choix. Tu n’étais pas là quand j’ai finalement rencontré un homme avec qui j’ai l’intention de passer une bonne partie de ma vie. Et maintenant, tu n’es pas là pour ce moment. 

Tu me manques en maudit grand-papa. 

Last time

I am starting my last essay for my undergrad. 

As much as I hated those damn assignments for four years, it is still a bittersweet moment for me. This essay represents my last time freaking out about a deadline in an education setting. It means the end of my time at the University of Ottawa. When I hand this in on the 24th of April, it will be the last time I will set foot on campus as a student. I close the door to all the friends and great people I have met in the last four years. I was never good at goodbyes. (Maybe I should focus on what my mishomis told me once: “Madjashin nin dada”, meaning I’ll see you later. In Algonquin culture, there are no goodbyes, actually. We always believe we will cross paths, wether it be in the physical or spiritual world). 

But even so, I still feel my heart clench when I think that I am done school. Now I don’t have the securities school offered me. My job search is, up to now, fruitless. I now live in stress, trying to determine how the hell am I going to pay my bills? How am I going to feed myself? How am I going to feed my cat? Will I ever find a job? Will I be miserable?

I can feel myself getting deeper and deeper into depression’s claws, and all my energy leaving me. I don’t even have little victories to motivate me. I feel like giving up. On me, on life, on everything. I feel like giving up on Kyle, because I’m afraid of dragging him down with me. I don’t know what to do with myself.

Which is quite ironic, considering my field of choice in Social Services. 

Anyways, I just need hope and hope for the best. 

instagram

instagram:

Doing Your Part on Earth Day with @litterati

For more of Jeff’s finds, follow @litterati on Instagram and contribute your own discoveries with the #litterati hashtag. To see more photos and videos from Earth Day celebrations around the world, browse the #earthday2014 and #earthday hashtags.

Spotting a piece of garbage in the woods during a walk with his young daughter sparked the inspiration for Jeff Kirshner’s project, @litterati.

"Seeing my daughter’s perplexed expression reminded me of when I was a kid at summer camp," explains Jeff. "Before our parents came to visit, our director made us each pick up five pieces of trash. So I thought, why not apply that same crowdsource­ cleaning model to the entire planet?"

Litterati introduces a social element to cleaning up garbage. The steps are simple:

  1. Find a piece of litter
  2. Photograph it with Instagram
  3. Add the “#litterati” hashtag
  4. Throw out, recycle or compost the litter

Your photo is then added to the digital landfill of cleaned-up garbage, and the people who see your photo in their feed are encouraged to participate as well.

To date, more than 40,000 pieces of garbage have been picked up across 45 countries. Visit litterati.org to learn more about where litter accumulates and what items are most commonly found.

Tout le monde qui me disent constamment qu’ils me manquent, et que nous devrions faire des choses plus souvent, arrêtez-moi ces mensonges et faites-moi une faveur en vous fermant la gueule.

Je suis complètement tannée d’entendre ces sottises, surtout quand je vois que vous vous êtes tous attroupés, tous les veux qu’ils clament me manquer, et de ne pas m’inviter.

Vous êtes tous des hypocrites et devinez-quoi, j’m’en caliss à ce point-ci.

You moved on without me and guess what, I can do the same. En fait je l’ai déjà fait.

Quatre ans passé.